Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Six rules of proper Event Management


Working smarter not harder




They told me they'd tried it before and it'd been a flop. But I was confident my first event for Arup's new email management software tool would be a success.

You don't have to have a ton of money, but you have to always aim to work smart. So many companies make the fatal error of starting marketing too late. Then it's a mad rush to get everything done in time.

Check out my free startup marketing service consultation.

Running an event without the correct 'runway' of time to carry out marketing for it is stressful, arduous work. People often don't think very well in that situation.

Unless you are one of the 2% of the population who can genuinely multi-task, typically you will lose 15 IQ points when they try to accomplish this; not a 'smart' way to run an event!

Event team photo, me in the red tie



I held our first event in Arup's headquarters in London on March 14th. 28 Hands have its second breakfast event on Wednesday 8th May. 

I aimed for 16 at the first event and made 22. I already have 50 attendees registered for the second event when it's still one month away. 

Thursday 14 March was a big day for Mail Manager. Not only did we have our first breakfast event. However, we were also running the Viewpoint Mail Manager webinar: Viewpoint for Projects and mail manager integration.

That month, myself and my other marketing manager, Joanne Waddell, took our email campaign numbers from the average of 2000 a month to 123,000! Joanne is one of the best marketers I've worked with so we had fun building that success together!

I also managed to generate some low-cost PPC, and Social Media leads on top of that.

Senior Client Manager, Mario Christophides, started the morning with hard, but fair, statements:

Other industries are quicker to adapt than construction

UK productivity issue which we address by working longer hours

We can achieve better productiveness by collaborating better. 

Lucy Prior then provided an overview of how Mail Manager helps Arup capture 80% of their project correspondence. 

She explained that Arup developed Mail Manager in response to email becoming a significant problem for their business, particularly commercially sensitive information being locked in inboxes.

Project Managers and Engineers were not sharing data across their teams and in frustration, Arup developed Mail Manager for their own employees.


Lucy Prior,  Mail Manager's Top Salesperson, presenting a live software demo at the event.

   
         
Paul Hill is an Information Manager within Arup's program project management office.

Paul leads Information Management on large projects using a variety of software including Common Data Environments such as ProjectWise which Mail Manager integrates.


              Paul Hill, Information Manager at Arup, with Lucy Prior, Mail Manager's Senior Salesperson.


                


Paul said that at Arup, thanks to Mail Manager, email is no longer a problem – it’s a problem that we have solved.

He demonstrated by showing us the 'Social network' of projects he was working on, and how one project, in particular, he’d been working on since 2011.

Paul showed us that hundreds of people had sent over 35,000 emails during this project. Using the Mail Manager search, he’s able to access anything across the project in a matter of seconds. 

Six rules for setting up, running and following up on your first event:

Planning, Planning, Planning


1. PRE-EVENT EMAIL MARKETING

 I set up an email automation campaign for one month or more before the event. My automation will include a series of 'if/not' decision trees; If my prospect opens and clicks on the first ever email I send them one which is more personalised and has more detail in it.


If not, I send them an email that will try to capture their interest with a catchy subject line and a variety of topics.  If my prospect hits on the event landing page but does not sign up, I will send them a reminder email a few days later, again, perhaps with some video of a previous keynote and so on.

I create a top Landing page to maximise the number of attendees. 

2. SOCIAL MEDIA

Create 'buzz' around the event. Fortunately, I have a lot of friends in Branding who know a lot about this. One used to work for HSBC, another ran EMEA Brand Management for Hyatt Hotels,  and yet another friend of mine was Chief Creative Officer at Coca Cola. It helps to talk with 'ideas' people to come up with events and marketing that will 'hit them between the eyes'.                                                                                                                                                                                      

3. LISTEN TO YOUR PROSPECTS

You can use social media to understand your audience better.  Posting titbits on linked or Twitter will get you many reactions. Monitor these religiously to get a feel for what your prospects want to see and hear, not only at the event but before and after it. I also use surveys at the event and online tools like Survey Monkey. However, keep these short and sweet. No one wants to spend twenty minutes filling out hundreds of questions. Limit it to five, with the option for them to leave comments. 

4. KEEP NOTES ON WHAT IS WORKING AND NOT WORKING

My last event, one of our prospects asked if we had sent an outlook calendar invite to him for the date. I had not done that. But I checked into our new CRM system and saw that I could send invites en mass. I will certainly be doing this for the next event. Your prospects and customers know what they want better than you. Don't ever forget that.

5. HAVE SOME BIG NAMES

I'm a startup to mid-size kind of guy. I tend to do well in those nimble, fast-growing companies. But we all like to hear about the big names, whether it's celebrities, billionaires, supermodels or large organisations. Some names I've had at events I've run, have been anyone from Verizon Wireless to Black rock, from Mckinsey to TJ Maxx.

6. SHOW THEM THE LOVE

 I always want to show my prospects that I care. I want great food, inspiring talks, fantastic giveaways and attractive hosts. I may be getting a bit old to be 'young and beautiful', but I dress up and wear a suit and tie to look my very best.

My attendees have taken valuable time out of their busy schedules to see us. I want to do the absolute best to make that an outstanding and hopefully memorable and useful, experience for them.

To continue your Marketing journey to understand how to generate leads, and bring them through the marketing flywheel to close, click on the start button for my website.


   
          

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Branding and strategy: Head of European Marketing at Hyatt


Henny Frazer, Ex-Director of Brands EAME & SWA, Hyatt Hotels

One of my pleasures is meeting up with an old friend after a long absence. It was great to meet Henny after all these years. Henny has been living in Zurich, Switzerland for the last five years and I have been living in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, for ten.

We met up at The Ivy Chelsea Garden, on the King's Road, which was appropriate for several reasons;

First, it used to be a Dive bar called Henry J Beans that we hung out at when we were young. The restaurant and we have 'grown up' over the years...

Secondly, it's a unique restaurant and Henny is an expert on them. Hospitality is her business; Specifically, luxury travel and hotels.

Henny Frazer, Ex-head of branding of Hyatt Hotels, Second from the left


My experience of branding comes mainly from working with agencies and corporate communications teams. My sector is fast-growing tech companies. Henny has worked with well-established luxury brands.

From a marketing perspective, we are at opposite ends of the spectrum. But I'm fascinated by branding. And who could deny Henny's undeniable talent for branding and strategy?

We both had travelled around India with a friend for several months when we were younger, and we talked about that first. Henny was in the south, in Goa. I was up in the North at Manali. We had both gone to the famous 'full moon' parties (In Goa in the winter and Manali in the summer).

The internet is a double edged sword; in some ways it's helped to strengthen and give new dimensions to certain marque brands. In other ways, it has commoditized a host of products. 

Price comparison sites have hammered the hotel business, in the same way, it's eaten into margins in the airline industry. A race to the bottom has ensued. The hotel business has also been threatened by disruptive technologies like Air BnB.

Henny talked about this and her work to try to distinguish brands so that they captured strong positive emotions and loyalty, which is falling amongst customers generally.

Andaz Hotel, Delhi



I was eager to find out more and asked Henny for examples. Henny told me a great story about her marketing initiative for the Andaz Delhi. Many hotels are having the same conversation; We are glamorous, we cater for your every need, we are beautiful and so on...

Connecting with the young and fashionable in Delhi




Henny had a different idea to really connect the hotel with the history and culture of Delhi, including the new young hip culture growing in the city. The main message for the Andaz brand is:

‘Arrive a Visitor, Depart a Local’

Why 401 Reasons? It’s simple - Andaz Delhi has 401 guestrooms. Every room has its own reason,
which is defined in the book.

In addition, as you enter each guestroom or suite, you will also find a unique piece of art, illustrating each reason.

The book covers a range of subjects from art and architecture to local delicacies, nature and shops. They produced the book with reasons like:

Reason 161 - Lassi                     
'Lassi is the much-loved yoghurt drink enjoyed all over  India. The sweet-tart drink is consumed in vast quantities in Delhi and may be served in fine hand-etched silver and brass cups, or terracotta tumblers and even plastic cups.'

Then the book would be left open at this page, for guests staying in room 379. Here's a link to the booklet.

She changed the conversation and managed to develop a deeper more significant bond with Hyatt customers in the process.

We covered such a wide range of subjects at lunch. But I think my favourites were: 

Grand Hyatt which has a powerful ‘Living Grand’ message and the Hyatt Centric brand which offers a springboard to discover a city. I enviously had seen footage of Henny at a Flow Rida concert at Hyatt Centric Chicago Magnificent Mile. 

Or the Hotel Du Louvre in which she, with the hotel team, worked on the rebranding of this hotel as it is has become part of the Unbound Collection by Hyatt. This hotel is all about slowing down and really becoming inspired by Paris.

They worked with a great illustrator and have produced a cute cartoon announcing the re-opening of the hotel.


Saturday, February 23, 2019

Business lessons from Boston's Donald Trump



One of the high-points of the ten years I lived in the US, was going to John Hynes the third's 50th birthday. It was in Chatham, a beautiful New England beach resort, in the summer. So it was a lovely sunny 28 degrees.




John is an institution in Boston. His father was a famous newscaster and his grandfather, John B Hynes, was a notable mayor of Boston. There are lots of buildings named after him, such as the Hynes Convention Centre, pictured above.

I have listened to John talk many times about business. We were pretty close for a while. John and his beautiful wife, Tracey, even came to our wedding - their presence honoured me since ours was a rather humble affair - I was still a student in the middle of my MBA degree.

The City that Jack built - New Songdo City, South Korea 






One building project he pioneered and completed as CEO of the Gale Corporation was the construction of New Songdo City, billed as ''the Hong Kong of the 21st century," for a cost of $25 Billion.

I was entirely in awe of the fact that here's this family man, with two children, who made this brutal 15 hour trip to South Korea once a month for several years.

The second big project he worked on was the $3.5 Billion Seaport redevelopment in Boston. He talked about how a $200 Million investment, paid off exceptionally well in the end.

However, he was always honest about the fears that a developer goes through. He also talked about the importance of developing relationships, for example with Morgan Stanley, to secure his last big loan for the Seaport development.

 Having important business relationships is something I have found crucial. In addition to my 1900 LinkedIn contacts, I have many close friends in diverse fields of business.

- From finance to technology, from Business to the Law

- Who I go to for advice, help and sometimes for work. You never know how someone you talk to today may one day come in useful in your business, and you in theirs.